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COMBAT LIFESAVER /TACTICAL COMBAT CASUALTYCARE TRAINER COURSESTUDENT HANDBOOK“THE BEST FORM OF TROOPWELFARE IS TOUGH, REALISTICTRAINING”

Combat Lifesaver / Tactical Combat Casualty CareInstructor CourseTable of ContentsInstructor Preparation1Core Skills7Conduct a Lesson23Lesson PlansCombat Application Tourniquet31Nasopharyngeal Airway37Pressure Dressing43HEMCON Dressing49Occlusive Dressing55QUICKCLOT61

UNITED STATES MARINE CORPSField Medical Training BattalionCamp PendletonInstructor PreparationTerminal Learning Objectives(1) With the aid of references and given instructional materials,prepare the instructional environment in accordance with Chapter 4of the SAT Manual. (TCCC 0.01)(2) With the aid of references and given instructional materials,rehearse a lesson in accordance with Chapter 4 of the SAT Manual.(TCCC 01.02)Enabling Learning Objectives(1) With the aid of references and given instructional materials,prepare the instructional setting in accordance with Chapter 4 ofthe SAT Manual. (TCCC 01.01a)(2) With the aid of references and given instructional materials,brief support personnel in accordance with Chapter 4 of the SATManual. (TCCC 01.01b)(3) With the aid of references and given instructional materials,prepare student materials in accordance with Chapter 4 of the SATManual. (TCCC 01.1c)(4) With the aid of references and given instructional materials,perform administrative functions in accordance with Chapter 4 ofthe SAT Manual. (TCCC 01.01d)(5) With the aid of references and given instructional materials,check personal appearance in accordance with Chapter 4 of the SATManual. (TCCC 01.01e)(6) With the aid of references and given instructional materials,conduct rehearsals in accordance with Chapter 4 of the SAT Manual.(TCCC 01.01a)(7) With the aid of references and given instructional materials,demonstrate evidence of rehearsal in accordance with Chapter 4 ofthe SAT Manual. (TCCC 01.01b)12 FEB 06

1. PREPARE INSTRUCTIONAL ENVIRONMENT. Prior to deliveringinstruction, the instructor must prepare the instructionalenvironment for an organized and smooth presentation to maximizethe transfer of knowledge and skills. The instructionalenvironment refers to the instructional setting (classroom),media/equipment, support personnel, student materials, and theadministrative functions the instructor must perform. Wheneverpossible, the instructor must ensure that the instructionalsetting replicates the job setting as much as possible.Organizing and placing required equipment or supplies achievethis, as they would be in the job setting.a. Set-Up. The instructor must also ensure that theinstructional setting is conducive to learning. This isaccomplished by ensuring the following:(1) Lighting and ventilation are adequate, media equipmentis accessible, and the climate control is functioningproperly.(2)Chairs and desks are available for each student.(3)Unnecessary distractions are removed.(4) If an outdoor area is to be used, the instructor mustsurvey the area to ensure it can be prepared per thespecific lesson plan and local Standing Operating Procedure(SOP). An alternate site should be designated in the eventthe primary site cannot be used(5) Ensure that all ORM and safety considerations have beenaddressed.b. Prepare Equipment. The instructor must gather and set up allthe instructional equipment required for the presentation ofthe lesson. Equipment can include items such as DigitalVideo Disc (DVD) players, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD)projectors, computers, etc. All the required equipment isoperational. If the equipment cannot be repaired orreplaced, alternate equipment must be obtained.c. Brief Support Personnel. Support personnel include assistantinstructors, demonstrators, role players, Corpsman (whenapplicable), and any other personnel who will be involved inthe presentation or support of instruction. The instructormust brief support personnel so that each person’s role isclearly understood. Additionally, the learning objectives of22 FEB 06

the lesson and any needed preparations for instruction mustalso be briefed.(1) The primary instructor is responsible for ensuring thatall personnel are informed when to meet. Some personnelmay need to be at the instructional area early to secureand set up equipment or to have student materials in placeprior to the start of the class.(2) Demonstrators should be briefed on their roles and iftime permits, a walk through of the demonstration should beconducted prior to instruction.d. Prepare Student Materials. The instructor must ensure thatall materials required by the students are available, in goodcondition, and ready to be distributed. These may be studentoutlines (primary document that supports the instruction) orsupplemental student materials (something other than thestudent outline that is retained by the student afterinstruction).e. Perform Administrative Functions. There are severaladministrative functions the instructor must address prior toimplementation of instruction. The following list presentssome of these administrative concerns:(1)Verify the time and location of the class.(2)Obtain the class roster.(3) Make arrangements for monitor/visitor seating inaccordance with local SOP.(4) Ensure appropriate security or safety measures have beenfollowed.(5)Prepare all administrative paperwork for presentation.f. Personal Appearance. One of the last things to do before“stepping on the platform” is looking in the mirror to checkpersonal appearance. Whether military or civilian, aninstructor must make sure that his/her attire is neat andprofessional. There is nothing worse than an instructor whoappears before a class looking sloppy and unkempt, which inmost situations distracts the learner’s attention from thematerial.32 FEB 06

2. CONDUCT REHEARSALS. Most people perform best when they are wellprepared. The success of any presentation is a direct result ofthe amount of work that went into preparing it. Rehearsal isthe process in which an instructor practices delivering theirlesson. Rehearsing the lesson will reveal the most effectivewording, enhance the instructor’s knowledge of the subjectmatter, ensure a smoother flow of the presentation, and increasethe chances for success. Rehearsal also provides the instructora gauge of how his or her delivery fits the allocated time forthe lesson.a. Types. We will discuss three types of rehearsals today,individual, small critical audience, and dress. Each ofthese can stand-alone; however, preparation is maximized whenthey are all conducted in sequence.(1) Individual. The individual rehearsal requires theinstructor to practice delivering the material alone.Individual rehearsals can take place anywhere, anytime, andat the convenience of the instructor. Some instructorsrehearse on their way to work in their car, or in theshower. It is recommended to videotape individualrehearsals when possible.(2) Small Critical Audience. Upon completion of anindividual rehearsal, the lesson should be presented to asmall group of people.Emotional attitudes must beconsidered when selecting the audience. Ensure the peopleselected will provide constructive feedback. It isrecommended to use family or peers. The instructor shouldbe thick-skinned enough to accept feedback at face value.Tape this rehearsal if possible.(3) Dress. The dress rehearsal should be the finalrehearsal and most important of all rehearsals. By thispoint every effort should have been made to remove anydiscrepancies in the lesson. This rehearsal should beaccomplished in the instructional setting that will be usedwhen the actual lesson is conducted. Rehearse with allmedia and equipment that will be used on presentation day.Also, make certain any assistant instructors or supportpersonnel are available to rehearse during the dressrehearsal. As with the other two types of rehearsals, tapethis if possible.b. How to Rehearse. There are several topics you would want toremember when you rehearse. The things we are going todiscuss at this point relate to the three types of rehearsal,42 FEB 06

but we need to address the ways in which we can rehearse.Key factors to remember when rehearsing;(1) Avoid Memorization. Never memorize the lesson becauseit will give the presentation a canned effect causing theinstructor to appear robotic. Know the outline (conceptualframework), sequence, and the points to be covered, but donot memorize the lesson verbatim (word for word) from thelesson plan. Below are some recommendations that can helpavoid memorization:(a)Read the lesson plan at least twice and highlightwords or key phrases that need to be emphasized. Ifanything is unclear, request guidance from otherinstructors.(b)Research the technical manuals and references tobroaden your knowledge of the subject.(c)Review all supplemental material.(d)Print the media (3 slides per page) and write noteson the right hand side of the page. The notes caninclude: key phrases from the lesson, examples,analogies, stories, or anything else that needs to bementioned or accomplished when that particular slide isdisplayed. If you are using a turn chart ortransparencies write notes as well. Once you’recomfortable rehearse without the notes.(2) Rehearse by Parts. If there is any part of your lessonwith which you feel uncomfortable or feel you need morepractice with, you should rehearse that part separatelyfrom the rest of your lesson until you feel confident withthat part.(3) Rehearse for Criticism. Rehearse your lesson for thesake of criticism in front of an audience. This audienceshould be fellow instructors or curriculum developersresponsible for the development of the lessons.(4) Rehearse the Whole Lesson. After the instructorrehearses and is comfortable with the different parts, thelesson should be rehearsed from start to finish. Aninstructor can get a false sense of security when he or sheis comfortable rehearsing only specific parts. This isessential to ensure that the lesson flows smoothly.52 FEB 06

c. Evidence of Rehearsal. Let’s look at some of the topics thatindicate whether or not you have rehearsed. It is importantto note that a lack of rehearsal may cause students to formnegative opinions regarding the lesson, the instructor'sprofessionalism and abilities, and the course orinstructional program (student barriers). However, properrehearsal will produce the following positive results.(1) Presentation Flowed Smoothly. If the entirepresentation flows smoothly, it is most likely due toinstructor rehearsal. Conversely, if the presentation ischoppy or disjointed, it can be presumed that theinstructor did not rehearse appropriately.(2) Instructor Appears Knowledgeable. When an instructorappears knowledgeable about the subject matter, it isevidence of rehearsal.(3) Instructor Appears Comfortable. The next considerationis whether or not the instructor appears comfortable in theclassroom. The instructor should know where all theequipment and media are located and the presentation shouldnot be interrupted because the instructor could not operatethe equipment or media. If the instructor appears relaxedwhile delivering the presentation then he or she mostlikely spent enough time rehearsing.d. Time Limit. Further evidence of rehearsal is the effectivedelivery of the instruction within the time allocated. Ifthe instructor remains within the time limit then it is mostlikely due to rehearsal.Reference:SAT Manual Chapter 462 FEB 06

UNITED STATES MARINE CORPSField Medical Training BattalionCamp PendletonCore Skills for a Technical TrainerTERMINAL LEARNING OBJECTIVES1. With the aid of references and instructional materials, reviewcore skils for a technical trainer per the SAT manual (TCCC.21.08)ENABLING LEARNING OBJECTIVES1. With the aid of references, and given a list of choices,define the characteristics of an adult learner per the SATManual. (TCCC.21.08a)2. With the aid of references, and given a list of choices,define the learning style of an adult learner per the SATManual. (TCCC .21.08b)3. With the aid of references, and given instructional materials,employ communication techniques throughout the lesson, per theSAT Manual. (TCCC .21.08c)4. With the aid of references, and given instructional materials,employ questioning techniques, per the SAT Manual. (TCCC.21.08d)5. With the aid of references, and given instructional materials,review the lesson materials, per the SAT Manual. (TCCC.21.08e)6. With the aid of references, and given instructional materials,prepare the classrom so that it is conducive to learning, perthe SAT Manual. (TCCC.21.08f)7. With the aid of references, and given instructional materials,conduct rehearsals, per the SAT Manual. (TCCC .21.08g)8. With the aid of references, and given instructional materials,demonstrate evidence of rehearsals, per the SAT Manual.(TCCC.21.08h)9. With the aid of references, and given instructional materials,conduct rehearsals, per the SAT Manual. (TCCC .21.08i)7

1. ADULT LEARNING CHARACTERISTICSa. Introduction(1) Formal educational instructions in modern society wereestablished exclusively for the education of children.At the time they were established, there was only onetheory about learners and learning – pedagogy.(a) Pedagogy is derived from the Greek words paid,meaning “child” and agogus, meaning “leader”; thuspedagogical theory is the art and science of teachingchildren. This form of teaching does not consider theknowledge and experiences that adults bring to thelearning environment.(b) Adrogogy is the term used to describe emergingtheories about adult learners. Androgogy is derivedfrom the Greek words aner, meaning “adult” (literallyman, not boy) and agogus; thus androgogy is the artand science of teaching adults.(2) One of the factors that instructors consider whenimplementing training is whom they will teach. Marinesand Sailors are adult learners, but the approach totraining them depends on their experience. For example,consider how drill instruction differs for a recruit atMCRD and for a Sergeant going to Drill Instructor School.Both are considered adults, but the approach to trainingeach is completely different.b. Six Adult Learning Characteristics – There are manycharacteristics that help us define who we teach. We willfocus on six:(1) Adults are capable of Self-Direction – Adults avoid,resist, and resent situations where they are not treatedas adults. As an adult, there is a need to be treated byothers as capable of self-direction.(a) Self-Paced Learning – Correspondence courses, CBT(Computer Based Training)(b) Learner Self-Evaluation – In coaching and practicalapplication, the instructor guides the student to seewhere they need to improve. Using self-evaluation isvery effective for adult learners because they “own”the problem and the solution.(c) Share Responsibility – Instructor is responsible forproviding accurate information or demonstrating proper8

performance.learning.The student is responsible for the(2) Adults have Established Emotional Frameworks – Anystudent’s ability to learn is directly proportional tothe degree of emotional safety he or she feels. Anxiety,fear, and lack of confidence are emotions that cannegatively affect a student’s willingness to learn. Welldesigned and delivered instruction that considers thepotential for anxiety can educe or eliminate these fears.(3) Adult Bring Experience – Adults possess a large bankof previous learning comprised of formal education,training, culture, and life experience. Based on thisprior learning, adult learners formulate assumptionsabout the world. These assumptions can either help orhinder the learning of new material.(4) Adults must be Ready to Learn – WIIFM (What’s In ItFor Me)(5) Adults Learn Best in Small Groups – The collectiveexperience of the group adds to the process of learning(6) Adults Need a Supportive and Challenging environment –Adults need a learning environment that provides themwith a sense of acceptance, respect and support. Adultstend to shut down in a non-supportive environment.Skills Check Write a short description of a class youhave attended that did not consider adult learningcharacteristics. You have three minutes writing time. Beprepared to share your experience with the class and determinewhich principle was violated that caused the student to resistlearning.c. Learning Styles – Learning style refers to an individual’spreferred way of gathering, interpreting, organizing, andthinking about information. There are at least sixteen9

models of learning styles, we will discuss only a basicmodel.(1) Instructional Preference Model – This model focuses onthe medium in which learning occurs. It assumes thatstudents have different preferences for receivinginformation. Instruction that accounts for all threelearning styles will be the most cLearnersThese learners tend to learnbetter when they see the subjectmatter to learn. They like tolearn with photos, diagrams,charts, physical objects ordemonstrations.Thos who tend to learn betterwhen they hear it.These learners tend to learnbetter by performing the newtask. Although they may benefitfrom other methods, they learnbest when they perform a task.When teaching a kinestheticlearner how to swim, a lectureis less useful than a practicalapplication session.d. How Adults Learn(1)Three Stages(a) Context – Students need to know how a task fits intothe “big picture”1 First, explain to the students how a task relates tothe whole job2 Provide the details(b) Manageable Chunks – Dividing the instruction intosmall, logical pieces and identifying the criticalpoints.10

(c) Pactice – The best way to learn something is to doit. Allow the students time to practice what theyhave learned. Following the steps below producespositive results:1 Do the task at full speed2 Demonstrate the task slowly, emphasizing criticalpoints3 Allow the student to perform the task with you4 Allow the students to do the task on their own.I do it fast, I do it slow, you do it with me – now yougo.2. EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATIONa. Communication – the act of sending and receiving messagesand providing feedback on those messages. The messages canbe verbal, nonverbal, written, or physical. Even a lack ofaction can be a message! Communication is always anexchange between two or more people.b. Communication ssage/Feedbackc. Communication Techniques – The communication techniques youneed to use skillfully in the classroom are: verbal,nonverbal, listening, and questioning. They dramatically11

affect the transfer of learning and the instructor’sability to maintin student attention.(1) Verbal – There are eight speech techniques that youshould work on controlling whenever you are speaking. Weare going to look at each of them in detail. The charton the next page will emphasize some key points to helpyou understand verbal communication.VERBAL COMMUNICATION TECHINIQUESVOLUMELoudness or softness of a speaker’sviceIf you speak too loud, you will beoverbearingIf you speak too softly, studentsmay not understand youRemember, your voice always soundslouder to you than to a listernerSpeed ant which a person speaksRATEDIALECTATTENTION - Change the rate of yourdelivery to get your students’attentionMost languages have dialects, eachwith a distintive accent, grammarand vocabulary based on regional orethnic speech.Example: In Alabama parents telltheir children to stop “squinching”their eyes while watching TV “rat”now.People from Boston pronounce “Car”PRONOUNCIATION without the “r”ARTICULATIONArticulation is the delivery ofparticular speech sounds.We habitually chop, slur, and mumbleour words, rather than enuncatingthem plainly.Example:12“let me” in to“lemme”

FORCEEmphasize the correct sord orsyllable. Placing emphasis ondifferent words or syllables canchange the meaning of a sentence.Why, did you join the Navy?Why, did you join the Navy?Change in the pitch or tone.INFLECTIONInflection in your voice can makeyou sound¾ Happy or sad¾ Angry or pleased¾ Interested or boredUse pause to :PAUSEEnd a thoughtGive students a chcance to absorbthe materialConcentrate on the next pointDramatic impant to a statementDon’t use pet words such as “um”,“er” and “uh”(2)Nonverbal Communication – Pltform Behavior(a) Description – Nonverbal signals that cpmplementverbal communication. The following factors cancontribute to or hinder the communication process.1 Factors:a Posture – platform stance; Stay away from thepodium; stand with confidenceb Movement – use movement in moderationc Nervousness – Techinques to overcome nervousness1. Focus on student learning2. Reahearsing the lesson3. Positive mental attitude4. Relax and Enjoy teaching5. Be organized13

d Gestures – Avoid lailing your arms; rubbing yourhands, cracking your knucklese Facial Expressions – Appear relaxed and expressenthusiasmf Eye Contact – The most meaningful channel ofnonverbal communication. Try to establish eyecontact with the whole audience.(3) Listening – As instructors, you need to be aware ofsignals that give your students the perception that youae not listening to them. These barriers interrupt thecommunicationprocessMessageInstructor ge / Feedback(a)Student Barriers to Listening1 Lack of Concentration2 Listening too Hard3 Jumping to Conclusions4 Focusing on Delivery and Personal Appearance14

(4)Questioning(a) By asking questions throughout the lesson,instructors can1 Emphasize a teaching point2 Monitor student comprehension3 Stimulate thinking4 Increase interest5 Promote student participation(b)Four Characteristics of a well Constructed QuestionFOUR CHARACTERISTICS OF A WELL CONSTRUCTED QUESTIONCharacteristics Description1. Clearstate in a language famililar to the studentsand phrased so that the students understand themeaning of the question.2. Concisecontains only one idea and short enough forstudents to remember (not too wordy)3. Releventrelates to the subject or material taught in thelesson3. ThoughtProvokingstate so that the answer is not sugested in thequestion; open-ended (not a yes or no response);(c)Four Steps for Asking Students QuestionsSTEPS FOR ASKING QUESTIONSStepsTechniqueDescriptionStep 1AskASK the question (call students by name)Step 2PausePAUSE to allow the student time to think.Rephrase or redirect the question if you needto for the students to understand. Solicithelp form the other students.Step 3EnsureEveryoneHeardENSURE EVERYONE HEARD the answer. Example:“did everyone hear his / he answer?”Step 4ProvideFeedbackInform the class whether or not the answerwas correct. Example: “that’s right” or“good job”. Avoid saying “wrong answer” try15

“that wasn’t quite what I was looking for,can someone help him/her out?”(d)Receiving Questions From StudentsSTEPS FOR RECEIVING QUESTIONSSteps Techinque DescriptionStep1ReceiveEnsure students raise their hands and solicitone student at a time (by name).Step2RephraseIf the question is unclear, rephrase. Example:“let me make sure I understood you question.You wanted to know why bunnies are fluffy. Wasthat your question?Step3Ensure“Did everyone hear PFC Lejeune’s question?”theYou may rephrase the question or ask thequestionstudent to repeat the question.was heardStep4AnswerYou can answer the question or re-direct thequestion to the entire class to allow forstudent participation. Example: “that’s agood question, can anyone answer it?”Step5VerifyAsk the student if the answer provided wasadequate. Example: “Did that help you?”SkillscheckDo You think questions are important?Explain why an instructorprovoking questions.shouldaskthoughtWhat does relevent mean and give examples of thoughtprovoking questions.4. PREPARE INSTRUCTIONAL ENVIRONMENT. Prior to deliveringinstruction, the instructor must prepare the instructionalenvironment for an organized and smooth presentation tomaximize the transfer of knowledge and skills. Theinstructional environment refers to the instructional setting(classroom), media/equipment, support personnel, student16

materials, and the administrative functions the instructormust perform. Whenever possible, the instructor must ensurethat the instructional setting replicates the job setting asmuch as possible. Organizing and placing required equipmentor supplies achieve this, as they would be in the job setting.PREPARE INSTRUCTIONAL nnelThe instructor must also ensure that theinstructional setting is conducive to learning.This is accomplished by ensuring the following:1. Lighting and ventilation are adequate, mediaequipment is accessible, and the climatecontrol is functioning properly.2. Chairs and desks are available for eachstudent.3. Unnecessary distractions are removed.4. If an outdoor area is to be used, theinstructor must survey the area to ensure itcan be prepared per the specific lesson planand local Standing Operating Procedure(SOP). An alternate site should bedesignated in the event the primary sitecannot be used5. Ensure that all ORM (Operational RiskManagement) and safety considerations havebeen addressed.The instructor must gather and set up all theinstructional equipment required for thepresentation of the lesson. Equipment caninclude items such as Digital Video Disc (DVD)players, Liquid Crystal Display (LCD) projectors,computers, etc. All the required equipment isoperational. If the equipment cannot be repairedor replaced, alternate equipment must beobtained.1. Support personnel include assistantinstructors, demonstrators, role players,Corpsman (when applicable), and any otherpersonnel who will be involved in thepresentation or support of instruction. Theinstructor must brief support personnel sothat each person’s role is clearly understood.Additionally, the learning objectives of thelesson and any needed preparations forinstruction must also be briefed.2. The primary instructor is responsible for17

ensuring that all personnel are informed whenand where to meet. Some personnel may need tobe at the instructional area early to secureand set up equipment or to have studentmaterials in place prior to the start of theclass.3. Demonstrators should be briefed on their rolesand if time permits, a walk through of thedemonstration should be conducted prior toinstruction.PrepareStudentMaterialsThe instructor must ensure that all materialsrequired by the students are available, in goodcondition, and ready to be distributed. Thesemay be student outlines (primary document thatsupports the instruction) or supplemental studentmaterials (something other than the studentoutline that is retained by the student afterinstruction).There are several administrative functions thePerformAdministrative instructor must address prior to implementationof instruction. The following list presents someFunctionsof these administrative concerns:(1) Verify the time and location of the class.(2) Obtain the class roster.(3) Make arrangements for monitor/visitor seatingin accordance with local SOP.(4) Ensure appropriate security or safety measureshave been followed.Prepare all administrative paperwork forpresentation.PersonalAppearanceOne of the last things to do before “stepping onthe platform” is looking in the mirror to checkpersonal appearance. Whether military orcivilian, an instructor must make sure thathis/her attire is neat and professional. Thereis nothing worse than an instructor who appearsbefore a class looking sloppy and unkempt, whichin most situations distracts the learner’sattention from the material.5. CONDUCT REHEARSALS - Most people perform best when they arewell prepared. The success of any presentation is a direct18

result of the amount of work that went into preparing it.Rehearsal is the process in which an instructor practicesdelivering their lesson. Rehearsing the lesson will revealthe most effective wording, enhance the instructor’s knowledgeof the subject matter, ensure a smoother flow of thepresentation, and increase the chances for success. Rehearsalalso provides the instructor a gauge of how his or herdelivery fits the allocated time for the lesson.a. Three Types of Rehearsals – Each of these can stand alone,however, they are more effective when done in conjunctionwith each other.3 TYPES OF REHEARSALSIndividualSmallCriticalAudienceDressThe individual rehearsal requires theinstructor to practice delivering the materialalone. Individual rehearsals can take placeanywhere, anytime, and at the convenience ofthe instructor. Some instructors rehearse ontheir way to work in their car, or in theshower. It is recommended to videotapeindividual rehearsals when possibleUpon completion of an individual rehearsal, thelesson should be presented to a small group ofpeople.Emotional attitudes must beconsidered when selecting the audience. Ensurethe people selected will provide constructivefeedback. It is recommended to use family orpeers. The instructor should be thick-skinnedenough to accept feedback at face value. Tapethis rehearsal if possible.The dress rehearsal should be the finalrehearsal and most important of all rehearsals.By this point every effort should have beenmade to remove any discrepancies in the lesson.This rehearsal should be accomplished in theinstructional setting that will be used whenthe actual lesson is conducted. Rehearse withall media and equipment that will be used onpresentation day. Also, make certain anyassistant instructors or support personnel areavailable to rehearse during the dressrehearsal. As with the other two types ofrehearsals, tape this if possible.19

b. How to Rehearse - There are several topics you would wantto remember when you rehearse. The things we are going todiscuss at this point relate to the three types ofrehearsal, but we need to address the ways in which we canrehearse. Key factors to remember when rehearsing;AvoidMemorizationNever memorize the lesson because it willgive the presentation a canned ef

Combat Lifesaver / Tactical Combat Casualty Care Instructor Course Table of Contents . Instructor Preparation 1